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Worcestershire CCGs no longer support the prescribing of certain medications including over the counter medicines (for example paracetamol and ibuprofen), gluten-free products, baby milk and specialist infant formula and oral nutritional supplements. For more information please visit www.worcestershire.nhs.uk/prescribing/

Respiratory clinic

The respiratory clinic is run by Sister Lewis. 

The purpose of the clinic is to regularly review our asthma and COPD patients so that, as far as possible, we can prevent serious asthma attacks.  We encourage any patient who is receiving medication for asthma or COPD to attend the clinic.

ASTHMA

 

What can I do to help myself?

 

Keep taking medication as prescribed

Stop smoking for more information and help to stop smoking go to www.nhs.uk/smokefree

Eat a healthy diet

Exercise regularly

Have regular reviews with Doctor/nurse to continually update your management plan.

Have a Flu jab every year (if you are on a steroid inhaler)

Book an appointment with a Doctor or Respiratory Nurse if you feel that your Asthma is not controlled or that you have an infection.

 

Signs that your Asthma is not controlled

Symptoms such as wheezing, chest tightness

Symptoms at night that disturb sleep

Symptoms that make everyday activities more difficult

Using reliever inhaler more often than usual

Peak flow is below normal predicted range

 

Signs the worsening might be due to an infection

 

Coughing up more mucus than normal or different coloured mucus

High temperature, fever or chills

Feeling tired or weak

Sore throat or pain on swallowing

Blocked nose, pressure in sinuses or headache

 

Signs of an Emergency

 

Using reliever a lot

Reliever isn’t helping

Difficulty in breathing

Not able to talk in full sentences

Symptoms such as chest tightness, wheezing, cough are worse than normal

Peak flow reading is less than half your normal reading 

 

What to do in Asthma attack

 

1 Take 2 puffs of reliever inhaler

2 Sit down, try to relax and take slow deep breaths

3 If you don’t feel better take 2 puffs of you reliever every 2 minutes; you can take up to 10 puffs

4 If no better call 999 immediately, if the ambulance isn’t there in 10 minutes, take 2 puffs of your reliever again, up to 10 puffs.

5 If you feel better and don’t need to go to A&E you should still see your GP or Nurse in the same day.

6 If you have been prescribed prednisolone tablets (steroids) to keep at home then take as instructed by Doctor/Nurse.

 

 

COPD

 

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an umbrella term for people with chronic bronchitis, Emphysema or both. 

 

What can I do to help myself?

 

Have regular reviews with Doctor/nurse to continually update your management plan

Keep taking medication as prescribed

 

Stop smoking for more information and help to stop smoking go to www.nhs.uk/smokefree

Eat a healthy diet

Exercise regularly

Have a Flu jab every year

Have a Pneumonia vaccination. This is a one off injection and not yearly like the Flu jab.

 

Signs that COPD is worsening

 

Coughing up more mucus than normal or different coloured mucus

Shortness of breath, that is worse than normal.

 

Book an appointment with a Doctor or Respiratory Nurse if you feel that your COPD is getting worse or that you have an infection.

 

 

 
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